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Saturday, January 10, 2015

Denmark kicking fossil fuels addiction


From RobertScribbler 




Back in 1971, on the eve of the world’s first global oil shocks, the European country of Denmark generated more than 80 percent of its electricity from crude. As the 70s progressed and the nation staggered under rising energy costs and failure to obtain supplies from this limited, exploited, and monopolized fuel source, Denmark began to embark on a campaign for energy independence that was then unprecedented. A campaign to rid itself of a destructive dependence on economically volatile, climatologically destructive, and easily manipulated fossil fuels.

At the time, Denmark began to turn back to its traditional use of wind — but as a direct source of electricity itself. The country, situated on a peninsula between the North and Baltic Seas is awash in breezes and the ever shifting flows of conflicting air masses. The idea, for Denmark, was to harness this energy as a means to break its dependence on foreign oil and, ultimately, remove fossil fuel use entirely.

At first, the going was slow. Wind energy facility construction moved gradually from test sites to small farms, to the first large utility scale ventures in the late 1980s. At this point, the nascent Vestas as well as the established Siemens had become primary producers of wind turbines on the global market. Steady growth through the year 2000 resulted in Denmark providing slightly more than 10 percent of its electricity from wind, solar and geothermal sources — with wind providing the bulk of this portion.

At this point, economies of scale began to kick in as wind power adoption in Denmark began to expand exponentially. Vestas and Siemens grew concordantly from niche energy players to primary contributors for a rapidly growing global electricity market. By the end of 2014, Denmark supplied more than 39 percent of its energy from wind alone.

The amount of oil used for electricity generation in Denmark now? Less than 3 percent. A staggering success that many, especially those supporting fossil fuel interests, never believed possible.


Read more here

 More and more wind power is being installed, in a classic exponentially rising curve.

It's all happening.  Thank you, Denmark.


2 comments:

  1. You might like to check out the situation in Scotland too.
    During November the country produced 100% of it's electrical power from wind alone and exported the excess.
    Scotland's target is for 100% renewable electricity by 2020.
    So far they have exceeded all previously set targets.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Indeed. It's happening everywhere. Despite everything the coal lobby is doing.

    ReplyDelete